Inventions of the Industrial Revolution

Here it is folks.  Choose one invention for your 3 minute oral presentation.  Make sure you have a visual aid.  I will discuss the rubric with you guys during class. Just make sure you sign up with Carolina.  We start the oral presentations on Thursday January the 24th.

  1. 1711-The Steam Engine by Thomas Newcomen
  2. 1733- Flying Shuttle by John Kay

3.    1764- Spinning Jenny by James Hargreaves

4.    1769- The Steam Engine by James Watt

5.    1787 Water Powered Loom by Edmund Cartwright (power loom)

6.    1794 Cotton Gin by Eli Whitney

7.    1804 steam locomotive by Richard Trevithick

8.    1810 printing press by Frederick Koenig

9.    1819 electromagnet by William Sturgeon

10.  1829 typewriter by William Austin Burt

11.  1830 sewing machine by Barthelemy Thimonnier

12.  1831 reaper by Cyrus H. McCormick

13.  1831 electric dynamo by Michael Faraday

14.  1834 wrench by Solymon Merrick

15.  1836 revolver by Samuel Colt

16.  1841 stapler by Samuel Slocum

17.  1845 pneumatic tire by Robert William Thomson

18.  1853 manned glider by George Cayley

19.  1857 sleeping car by George Pullman

20.  1861 bicycle by Pierre Michaux

21.  1866 dynamite by Alfred Nobel

22.  1868 tungsten steel by Robert Mushet

23.  1868 air brakes by George Westinghouse

24.  1876 internal combustion engine by Nicholas August Otto

25.  1880 light bulb by Thomas Edison

26.  1884 steam turbine by Charles Parson

27.  1892 diesel engine by Rudolf Diesel

28.  1893 zipper by L.L. Judson

29.  1895 motion picture by Lumiere brothers 

 

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Financial Illiteracy Is Killing Us

Financial Illiteracy Is Killing Us
By BRETT NELSON

Image via Wikipedia
As Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve dither over what to do about the darkening economy, I’m reminded of, and damn near demoralized by, a scene in “I.O.U.S.A.”, the remarkable and terrifying 2009 documentary about the burgeoning debt crisis in America.

In the scene, a cameraman asks a smattering of people to define “trade deficit.” Here was one of the better answers, delivered by a fresh-faced woman who looked roughly 18 years old: “Deficit usually means…disorder or something. Something is wrong with it. It’s not good.”

Ok, maybe the notion of importing more stuff than we export is a tad abstract. How about the notion of debt? Cameraman to passersby: “How big is the federal debt?” Some responses: “I’m guessing quite a bit”; “3 million”; “I know it’s in the billions.” Try $8.7 trillion. (The film was made in 2009–after bailouts, stimulus packages and healthcare reform, that number is now a few trillion higher, and will soon surpass the $14.5 trillion worth of goods and services this country produces annually.)

The point of “I.O.U.S.A.”—sponsored in part by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation (Mr. Peterson is a billionaire investor and former U.S. Secretary of Commerce)—is to scare us stiff about the consequences of mass fiscal irresponsibility. It succeeds. But it also drives at something deeper: our rotting education system that ultimately led to this problem.

That teenagers are allowed to drive, vote and parent, all while not knowing the difference between an asset and a liability, is nothing short of a travesty. Yet that’s what we have–and we are all paying for it.

I’m thinking now about the $1.3 trillion in delinquent consumer debt–$986 billion of it overdue by at least 90 days. One. Point. Three. Trillion. I’m also thinking about the wide-eyed throngs who signed up for no-doc mortgages they could never in their wildest dreams afford. And then there was the obvious mental mismatch between members of Congress and the Hank Paulsons, Ben Bernankes, Lloyd Blankfeins and their pin-striped ilk that led to a “financial reform” bill with so many holes that two institutions–Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which now own or guarantee half the entire mortgage market–fell right through. (Does anyone truly believe that was a fair fight?)

Here’s who should be thinking about all of this: the folks who run our schools. If the U.S. aims to compete–for anything–on a global scale, its populace has to be financially literate. And it isn’t. Not even close.

Consider the atrocious findings in a 2008 report by the Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy (underwritten, ironically enough, by Merrill Lynch). Begun in the 1997-1998 school year, the nationwide biennial survey of 12th graders aimed to determine “the ability of our young people to survive in today’s complex economy.” The 31-question exam touched on topics ranging from credit cards and car insurance to the stock market and home ownership. The results were bad, and are getting worse.

The average grade on the first exam was 57.3%. (You need a score of 60% to pass.) In 2008, it had dipped to 48.3%, with nearly three quarters of the 6,856 students failing. Fewer than 5 out of every 100 earned a “C” (75% or better). While college seniors scored higher on the same exam in 2008, averaging 64.8%, the Jump$tart report points out: “The good news is that most college graduates are financially literate. The bad news is that only 28% of Americans graduate from college, leaving nearly three quarters ill-equipped to make critical financial decisions.”

Here are some more arresting numbers, compiled by the folks at Practicalmoneyskills.com, sponsored by Visa.

–A 2009 Financial Literacy Survey of adults, conducted on behalf of the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, revealed that:

• 41% of U.S. adults, or more than 92 million people living in America, gave themselves a grade of C, D, or F on their knowledge of personal finance.

• One-third of adults report that they have no savings and only 23% are now saving more than they did a year ago because of the current economic climate.

• Among adults who have children under the age of 18 living in their household, 33% want to provide a college education for their child but have not done anything about it yet. Only 21% have established a 529 Plan or other education savings account and expect to be able to pay for four years of college for their children.

–Sallie Mae’s 2009 survey of how undergraduate students use credit cards revealed that:

• 84% of the student population has credit cards; half had four or more.

• Undergraduates are carrying record-high credit card balances. The average (mean) balance grew to $3,173, the highest in the years the study has been conducted. Median debt jumped to $1,645 from $946 in 2004. One out of five undergraduates carried balances between $3,000 and $7,000.

• Only 15% of freshmen had a zero balance, down from 69% in 2004.

• 60% of undergrads experienced surprise at how high their balance had reached, and 40% said they have charged items knowing they didn’t have the money to pay the bill.

• Only 17% said they regularly paid off all cards each month, and another 1% had parents, a spouse, or other family members paying the bill.

• 84% of undergraduates indicated they needed more education on financial management topics; 64% would have liked to receive information in high school and 40% as college freshmen.

–A 2009 survey of America’s “Financial IQ” by Capital One revealed that:

• Nearly half (47%) of those surveyed said they are putting less money into savings and the same percentage report that current economic conditions have caused them to dip into their savings to cover day-to-day expenses.

• While a third of those surveyed said they save regularly every month, only 12% report that they are saving the recommended 10-15% of their income for the future, and another 12% said they are not saving anything at all.

• The majority of Americans (59%) consider themselves to be highly knowledgeable or very knowledgeable when it comes to personal finance, down from 64% in 2007.

• Nearly two-thirds (63%) of those surveyed say they are extremely comfortable or very comfortable managing short-term finances but only half (54%) feel comfortable managing long-term finances.

(On those last points, I can’t help but recall the Lake Wobegon effect, which describes our collective tendency to think that we are all above average.)

The best weapon in the fight against financial illiteracy: education. Consider the results of a 2008 study by the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the Charles Schwab Foundation of teens participating in the financial education program Money Matters:

• Teens who reported learning a great deal about goal-setting were significantly more likely to also report that they had saved money for something they wanted and then purchased it (79%), compared to those who reported they learned little or nothing about goal-setting (58%).

• Teens who reported learning about managing savings and checking accounts were more likely to report having opened both types of accounts (57% vs. 44% opened a savings account; 36% vs. 28% opened checking accounts).

• Those who reported learning about saving money were more likely to save regularly (72% vs. 57%).

• Teens who learned to track spending were more likely to report having developed a budget (50%) vs. those who learned little or nothing (29%) and also more likely to save money to purchase something (80% vs. 60%).

With that, I have but one message to school principals, headmasters, chancellors, parents, members of Congress, the national business press and anyone charged with nurturing the next generation of consumers, investors and voters:

Help!

Sometimes The Earth Is Cruel

Leonard Pitts: Sometimes, the earth is cruel

10:28 PM CST on Thursday, January 14, 2010

Sometimes, the earth is cruel.

That is ultimately the fundamental lesson here, as children wail, families sleep out of doors, and the dead lie unclaimed in the rubble that once was Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Sometimes the rains fall and will not stop. Sometimes the skies turn barren and will not rain. Sometimes the seas rise and smack the shoreline like a fist. Sometimes the wind bullies the land. And sometimes, the land rattles and heaves and splits itself in two.

Sometimes, the earth is cruel. And always, when it is, we do the same thing. We dig ourselves out. We weep and mourn, we recover and memorialize the dead, we rebuild our homes. And we go on. This is the price of being human. And also, arguably, the noblest expression.

Sometimes, the earth is cruel, and you have no choice but to accept that as part of the bargain called life. And when it is your turn to deal with it, you do.

But what if it’s always your turn?

Surely some homeless, dust-streaked Haitian can be forgiven for thinking it is always Haiti’s turn, just days after the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere saw its capital city smashed by the strongest earthquake it has ever known, a 7.0-magnitude monster. Surely, the rest of us watching from afar, experiencing tragedy and devastation from the comfort of desk chairs and living room couches, are tempted to believe the same thing.

Bad enough, Haiti is wretchedly poor. Bad enough it has a history of political instability and colonialism, of being ignored by the major powers when it is not being exploited by them. Bad enough, all that, yet at the end of the day, those are disasters authored by human hands, by human greed, human corruption, human economic predation.

Sometimes, though, you have to wonder if the planet itself is not conspiring against this humble little nation.

After 1994, when Tropical Storm Gordon killed several hundred people, after 1998, when Hurricane Georges swept away more than 500 lives, after 2004, when the rains of Tropical Storm Jeanne claimed more than 2,000 souls, after 2005, when Hurricane Dennis took 25 lives in July and Tropical Storm Alpha snatched 17 in October, followed by Hurricane Wilma, which stole 11 more, after the double whammy of Hurricanes Fay and Gustav in 2008 killed more than 130 people and destroyed 3,100 homes, after all that, comes this latest insult – and a death toll officials cannot begin to even imagine. Perhaps as many as 100,000, they were saying on Wednesday.

Sometimes, the earth is cruel. To crawl the planet’s skin, scanning for tornadoes in Oklahoma, charting storm tracks in Florida, running from wildfires in California, is to understand this in a primal, personal way. It is to breathe a prayer that begins, “There, but for the grace of God …” It is to write relief checks, donate blood, volunteer material and time and to fear, even in the doing, that these gestures are small against the need, inconsequential against the ache of a people whose turn seems never to end.

But what else are you going to do? As the playwright put it, your arms too short to box with God. Even less have we the ability to answer the question that burns the moment: Why are the most vulnerable repeatedly assessed the highest price?

We are hamstrung by our own limitations, so we can only do what we always do, only send prayers and help. And watch, staggered by the courage it takes, as Haitians do what human beings always do, the thing at which they have become so terribly practiced.

Dig out. Weep and mourn. Memorialize the dead. Rebuild. Go on. And show the world once again a stubborn insistence on living, despite all the cruelties of the earth.

Miami Herald columnist Leonard Pitts Jr. may be contacted at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

My Buddy, Government, and

Every head is a different world, so the saying goes, and that is especially true with wants and needs. What women want is different that what men want. What adults want is going to be very different than what their kids might want. What Pepe Lobo wants might be very different than what Mel Zelaya wants, and what you want for that matter. We all want different things, at different times and in different places. That is just human nature. That is the case of my best friend and I. What he really wants is to have success in his new enterprise. i know he wants this really bad, because I have seen how much time and effort he has put into it. He is fully devoted on making his business work. But that is not what I want. all I want is to save enough for my kid´s college education and my retirement. All my energies will be devoted to this for the next couple of years. Wants are different, and this is good, because every head is a different world.

Sometimes The Earth Is Cruel

Leonard Pitts: Sometimes, the earth is cruel

10:28 PM CST on Thursday, January 14, 2010

Sometimes, the earth is cruel.

That is ultimately the fundamental lesson here, as children wail, families sleep out of doors, and the dead lie unclaimed in the rubble that once was Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Sometimes the rains fall and will not stop. Sometimes the skies turn barren and will not rain. Sometimes the seas rise and smack the shoreline like a fist. Sometimes the wind bullies the land. And sometimes, the land rattles and heaves and splits itself in two.

Sometimes, the earth is cruel. And always, when it is, we do the same thing. We dig ourselves out. We weep and mourn, we recover and memorialize the dead, we rebuild our homes. And we go on. This is the price of being human. And also, arguably, the noblest expression.

Sometimes, the earth is cruel, and you have no choice but to accept that as part of the bargain called life. And when it is your turn to deal with it, you do.

But what if it’s always your turn?

Surely some homeless, dust-streaked Haitian can be forgiven for thinking it is always Haiti’s turn, just days after the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere saw its capital city smashed by the strongest earthquake it has ever known, a 7.0-magnitude monster. Surely, the rest of us watching from afar, experiencing tragedy and devastation from the comfort of desk chairs and living room couches, are tempted to believe the same thing.

Bad enough, Haiti is wretchedly poor. Bad enough it has a history of political instability and colonialism, of being ignored by the major powers when it is not being exploited by them. Bad enough, all that, yet at the end of the day, those are disasters authored by human hands, by human greed, human corruption, human economic predation.

Sometimes, though, you have to wonder if the planet itself is not conspiring against this humble little nation.

After 1994, when Tropical Storm Gordon killed several hundred people, after 1998, when Hurricane Georges swept away more than 500 lives, after 2004, when the rains of Tropical Storm Jeanne claimed more than 2,000 souls, after 2005, when Hurricane Dennis took 25 lives in July and Tropical Storm Alpha snatched 17 in October, followed by Hurricane Wilma, which stole 11 more, after the double whammy of Hurricanes Fay and Gustav in 2008 killed more than 130 people and destroyed 3,100 homes, after all that, comes this latest insult – and a death toll officials cannot begin to even imagine. Perhaps as many as 100,000, they were saying on Wednesday.

Sometimes, the earth is cruel. To crawl the planet’s skin, scanning for tornadoes in Oklahoma, charting storm tracks in Florida, running from wildfires in California, is to understand this in a primal, personal way. It is to breathe a prayer that begins, “There, but for the grace of God …” It is to write relief checks, donate blood, volunteer material and time and to fear, even in the doing, that these gestures are small against the need, inconsequential against the ache of a people whose turn seems never to end.

But what else are you going to do? As the playwright put it, your arms too short to box with God. Even less have we the ability to answer the question that burns the moment: Why are the most vulnerable repeatedly assessed the highest price?

We are hamstrung by our own limitations, so we can only do what we always do, only send prayers and help. And watch, staggered by the courage it takes, as Haitians do what human beings always do, the thing at which they have become so terribly practiced.

Dig out. Weep and mourn. Memorialize the dead. Rebuild. Go on. And show the world once again a stubborn insistence on living, despite all the cruelties of the earth.

Miami Herald columnist Leonard Pitts Jr. may be contacted at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

Instructions

Follow the You Tube URL link to upload your video. Read the Wow blog located below the poll. Do the poll, be honest it is anonymous. Comment on your classmates videos. I recommend you watch Stefany’s video as well as Amilkar’s.

10th Grade Desarrollo Poll